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These are the most recent talks on this subject. As of December, 2019, There are more than 600 Dhamma talks on this and other teachings of the Buddha in my audio and video archives:

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SUPPORTJOHN HASPEL 

Satipatthana Sutta – Four Foundations of Mindfulness Retreat

October 1, 2021, to October 3, 2021

 Join Us In Frenchtown If You Can or Through Our Zoom Live-Stream

↓ To Reserve Your Space ↓
→ Email John ←

Cross River Meditation Center Directions / Live-Stream Information

Donations and Retreat Schedule

Each session will include Jhana meditation, Dhamma talk, and Sangha discussion
Retreat Suggested Donation $50.00

Donate Via Paypal

All Always welcome
All Donations for this retreat will provide funding for residential scholarships to our Spring 2022 retreat

Retreat Schedule

October 1
6:30 PM
Dhamma Teacher John Haspel

  • The importance of retreat and taking refuge in the Buddha, his Dhamma, and a well-focused and well-informed Sangha
  • Developing Right View from Wrong View
  • Introduction to Four Foundations of Mindfulness
  • First Foundation of Mindfulness

October 2

9:00 Qigong with Matt

9:30

Dhamma Teacher Matt Branham

  • Mindfulness of Feelings
  • Mindfulness of Thoughts
  • Mindfulness of the Present Quality of Mind
    (Second, Third, Fourth Foundations of Mindfulness)

12:00
Lunch, Lovin’ Oven

2:00

Dhamma Teacher Kevin Hart

  • Mindfulness of Five Clinging-Aggregates
  • Mindfulness of the Five Hindrances

5:00

Dinner, Bamboo House

 

7:00

Dhamma Teacher Jen Seiz

Mindfulness of Six-Sense-Base

October 4

9:00

Dhamma Teacher David Allen

Mindfulness of the Seven Factors of Awakening

 

12:00 Noon

Dhamma Teacher Ram Manders

  •     Mindfulness of the Four Noble Truths
  • The Effectiveness of The Four Foundations of Mindfulness

Welcome and Introduction to Our Fall 2021 Four Foundations of Mindfulness Retreat

Satipatthana Sutta – Four Foundations of Mindfulness Retreat

October 1 to October 3, 2021

Greeting Friends,

Along with my fellow Dhamma teachers, thank you for the honor of leading our Becoming Buddha  Four Foundations of Mindfulness Fall 2021 retreat. It is our intention to establish a most skillful and peaceful retreat environment.

Much like the setting of the first Buddhist Sangha, a retreat guided by the Eightfold Path will provide refuge from the entanglements of the world and the opportunity to deeply engage with the Buddha’s Dhamma. To that end, be mindful of the eight factors of the Eightfold Path.

The Buddha’s words offer simple and profound guidance:

  • Be mindful of wrong view and remain in Right View.
  • Be mindful of wrong intention and remain in Right Intention.
  • Be mindful of wrong speech and remain in Right Speech.
  • Be mindful of wrong action and remain in Right Action.
  • Be mindful of wrong livelihood and remain in Right Livelihood.
  • Bed mindful of wrong effort and remain in Right Effort.
  • Be mindful of wrong mindfulness and remain in Right Mindfulness
  • Be mindful of wrong meditation and practice Right Meditation.

Retreats guided by the Buddha’s Dhamma are not retreats from the Dhamma or from the opportunity for skillful interaction with each other, and so are not silent. Our retreat environment will be very similar to the Buddha’s Sangha 2,600 years ago. The first Sangha was guided by a simple observance: When gathered as a sangha be mindful of the Dhamma and support others in remaining mindful of the Dhamma.

As with the first Sangha, the Eightfold Path will guide our thoughts, our speech, and our actions, providing the ongoing experiential opportunity to deepen and refine mindfulness of all aspects of the Path.

A retreat guided by the Buddha’s Dhamma is an auspicious time to engage deeply in the Dhamma. This is how useful insight is developed – from a quiet and well-concentrated mind that supports the refined mindfulness to view Three Marks Of Existence from Right View.

Remaining mindful of Right Speech in your conversations with each other during our retreat is the most practical and effective way of beginning to integrate the Eightfold Path and Become Awakened. Supporting each other in maintaining Right Speech is one aspect of Right Speech and unites and supports our retreat Sangha within the guiding framework of the Eightfold Path.

The Buddha’s words from the Magga Vibhanga Sutta:

” And what is Right Speech?

  • Abstaining from lying
  • Abstaining from divisive speech
  • Abstaining from abusive speech
  • Abstaining from gossip
  • Abstaining from idle chatter

This, friends, is Right Speech.”

This is your retreat. This truly is an auspicious time. Gently leave the world, its “spiritual” concepts and ideologies, and its distractions behind, and engage wholeheartedly with these profound teachings.

The world will still be the world Sunday afternoon. By recognizing and abandoning clinging to wrong views you may very well be quite different!

Be mindful of Right Speech and the entire Eightfold Path. Deepen your understanding. Be gentle with yourself and in your skillful interactions with others. This is how practical understanding is developed within the Framework of The Eightfold Path.

Take true refuge in the Buddha, his Dhamma, and our wonderful and well-focused Sangha.

Peace.

John Haspel, Matt Branham, Kevin Hart, Jen Seiz, Ram Manders, David Allen

Friday 6:30 PM Session One

Dhamma Teacher John Haspel

Satipatthana Sutta

MAJJHIMA NIKAYA 120

The Buddha Introduces the Four Foundations of Mindfulness

On one occasion the Buddha was in Kammasadhamma where he addressed those assembled:

“Friends, there are four frames of reference – four foundations of mindfulness – that are required for the purification of all beings, for the overcoming of sorrow and regret, for the disappearance of pain and distress, for establishing the right method of practice, and for complete unbinding. What are these four?

Being mindful of the breath in the body, determined and alert and abandoning craving and aversion to what is occurring.

Being mindful of feelings arising from the six-sense base, determined and alert and abandoning craving and aversion to what is occurring.

Being mindful of thoughts arising from the six-sense base, determined and alert and abandoning craving and aversion to what is occurring.

Being mindful of the present quality of mind, determined and alert and abandoning craving and aversion to what is occurring.

MINDFULNESS OF THE BREATH IN THE BODY

Establishing the First Foundation of Mindfulness

“And how does one remain mindful of the breath in the body in and of itself?

“Finding a secluded spot – the shade of a tree or an empty hut – sitting erect with legs crossed in front, placing attention on the breath.

“Remaining mindful of the breath – breathe in and breathe out. Mindful of the breath, long or short, breathe in and breathe out. Training yourself to be sensitive to the breath and calming any bodily fabrication. Ever mindful calming the body with each in-breath and each out-breath.

“Remaining mindful of the breath in the body – mindful of the in-breath and the out-breath – the arising and passing away of phenomena with regard to the body.

“In this way one remains mindful internally and externally with regard to the body. With no self-reference, calmly noticing ‘there is a body,’ remaining independent of, and not clinging to anything in the world.

  • When walking, be mindful of walking.
  • When standing, be mindful of standing.
  • When sitting, be mindful of sitting.
  • When lying down, be mindful of lying down.
  • In any function, be mindful that ‘there is a body.’
  • When going about, looking this way and that, be fully mindful.
  • When bending or reaching, be fully mindful.
  • When carrying a bowl or a cloak, be fully mindful.
  • When eating, drinking, or savoring food, be fully mindful.
  • When eliminating waste, be fully mindful.
  • When walking, standing, sitting, sleeping, waking, talking or silent, be fully mindful.

“In this way, one remains mindful of the breath in the body – the in-breath and the out-breath.

“In this way, one remains mindful of the breath in the body – the arising and the passing away of the body – independent of and not clinging to anything in the world.

“Just as a person with good eyesight, emptying a bag full of mixed grains, would know ‘this is wheat, this is rice, these are beans, these are sesame seeds.’ In this same way one remains mindful from the soles of the feet to the top of the head, encased in skin, there is hair, nails, teeth, tendons, bones, marrow, organs, feces, phlegm, blood, urine, sweat, fat, tears, saliva, mucous, and fluid in the joints.

“In this way, one is mindful of the four elements – the earth element, the water element, the fire element, and the wind element.

The four elements that comprise a human being are impermanent.

“Be mindful of the impermanence of the body to develop dispassion. If left unattended, a corpse decays quickly. It becomes bloated and infested. It is picked at by birds and dogs and other creatures. Eventually, nothing is left but dust.

“Be mindful that ‘this very body, too’ will die and pass away. This the nature of the world – and unavoidable fate.

“In this way, one remains mindful of the breath in the body – the in-breath and the out-breath.

“In this way, one remains mindful of the arising and the passing away of the body – independent of and not clinging to anything in the world.

“This how one remains mindful of the breath in the body.”

Saturday 9:00 AM Qigong | 9:30 AM Session Two

Qigong Instructor and Dhamma Teacher Matt Branham

9:00 Qigong

9:30 AM Session Two

MINDFULNESS OF FEELINGS

Establishing the Second Foundation of Mindfulness

“And how does one remain mindful of feelings in and of themselves?

“When feeling pain be mindful that there is pain. When feeling pleasure be mindful that there is pleasure. When feeling neither pleasure nor pain (ambivalence) be mindful that there is neither pleasure nor pain.

“When feeling the pain of the body be mindful that there is pain of the body. When feeling pain not of the body (a disturbance in the mind) be mindful that there is pain not of the body.

“When feeling pleasure in the body be mindful that there is pleasure in the body. When feeling pleasure not in the body (an excitement in the mind) be mindful that there is pleasure not in the body.

“When feeling neither pleasure nor pain in the body be mindful that there is neither pleasure nor pain in the body. When feeling neither pleasure nor pain not in the body be mindful that there is neither pleasure nor pain not in the body.

“In this way, one remains mindful of feelings and the arising and the passing away of feelings – independent of and not clinging to anything in the world.

“In this way, one remains mindful internally and externally with regard to feelings. This is how one remains mindful of feelings in and of themselves.

MINDFULNESS OF THOUGHTS

Establishing the Third Foundation of Mindfulness

“And how does one remain mindful of thoughts in and of themselves?

“When thoughts are passionate be mindful that thoughts are passionate. When thoughts are dispassionate be mindful that thoughts are dispassionate.

“When there are thoughts of aversion be mindful that there are thoughts of aversion. When thoughts are free of aversion be mindful that thoughts are free of aversion.

“When thoughts are deluded be mindful that thoughts are deluded. When thoughts are free of delusion be mindful that thoughts are free of delusion.

How does one know delusion? Thoughts and actions that contradict the Eightfold Path are deluded.

“When the mind is constricted be mindful that the mind is constricted. When thoughts are scattered be mindful that thoughts are scattered. When the mind is spacious be mindful that the mind is spacious.

“When thoughts are common be mindful that thoughts are common. When thoughts are unsurpassed be mindful that thoughts are unsurpassed.

“When the mind is not concentrated be mindful that the mind is not concentrated. When the mind is concentrated be mindful that the mind is concentrated.

“When the mind is not released be mindful that the mind is not released. When the mind is released be mindful that the mind is released.

“In this way one remains mindful internally and externally with regard to thoughts.

MINDFULNESS OF THE PRESENT QUALITY OF MIND

Establishing the Fourth Foundation of Mindfulness

“And how does one remain mindful of the present quality of mind in and of itself? One remains focused on the mind internally or externally on the mind itself. One remains focused on the origination of the mind and the arising and the passing away of with regard to the mind itself. One knows ‘there is a mind.’ They remain independent of and not clinging to anything in the world. This how one remains mindful of thoughts in and of themselves.”

Saturday 2:00 PM Session Three

Dhamma Teacher Kevin Hart

MINDFULNESS OF THE FIVE CLINGING-AGGREGATES

“Furthermore, one remains mindful of the quality of the mind in reference to The Five Clinging-Aggregates.

Remain mindful of form and the arising and passing away of form.

Remain mindful of feelings and the arising and passing away of feelings.

Remain mindful of perceptions and the arising and the passing away of perceptions.

  • Remain mindful of fabrications and the arising and passing away of fabrications.

Remain mindful of consciousness and the arising and passing away of consciousness.

“In this way, one remains mindful of The Five Clinging-Aggregates and the arising and the passing away of The Five Clinging-Aggregates – independent of and not clinging to anything in the world. This is how one remains mindful of The Five Clinging-Aggregates in and of themselves.

MINDFULNESS OF THE FIVE HINDRANCES

Notice the guarantors offered by the Buddha. When one completely abandons a hindrance it will not arise again. Completely abandoning the hindrances is a reasonable goal and skillful reference to progress.

“Remain mindful of the quality of mind in reference to the five hindrances. When sensual desire is present be mindful that sensual desire is present. When sensual desire is not present be mindful that sensual desire is not present. Be mindful of abandoning sensual desire when it arises. Be mindful that when sensual desire has been (completely) abandoned, sensual desire will not arise in the future.

“When ill-will is present be mindful that ill-will is present. When ill-will is not present be mindful that ill-will is not present. Be mindful of abandoning ill-will when it arises. Be mindful that when ill-will has been (completely) abandoned, ill-will will not arise in the future.

“When laziness and drowsiness is present be mindful that laziness and drowsiness is present. When laziness and drowsiness is not present be mindful that laziness and drowsiness is not present. Be mindful of abandoning laziness and drowsiness when it arises. Be mindful that when laziness and drowsiness has been (completely) abandoned, laziness and drowsiness will not arise in the future.

“When restlessness and anxiety is present be mindful that restlessness and anxiety is present. When restlessness and anxiety is not present be mindful that restlessness and anxiety is not present. Be mindful of abandoning restlessness and anxiety when it arises. Be mindful that when restlessness and anxiety has been (completely) abandoned, restlessness and anxiety will not arise in the future.

“When doubt and uncertainty is present be mindful that doubt and uncertainty is present. When doubt and uncertainty is not present be mindful that doubt and uncertainty is not present. Be mindful of abandoning doubt and uncertainty when it arises. Be mindful that when doubt and uncertainty has been (completely) abandoned, doubt and uncertainty will not arise in the future.

“In this way, one remains mindful of the quality of mind and the arising and the passing away of the qualities of mind – independent of and not clinging to anything in the world. This is how one remains mindful of the quality of mind in and of itself.

Saturday 7:00 PM Session Four

Dhamma Teacher Jen Seiz

Mindfulness of Six-Sense-Base

“Furthermore, one remains mindful of the quality of the mind in reference to the six-sense base.

“Remain mindful of the eye-form and the clinging that arises from the eye-form. Be mindful of the arising of clinging to the eye-form. Be mindful that when clinging to the eye-form is (completely) abandoned, clinging to the eye-form will not arise in the future.

“Remain mindful of the ear-form and the clinging that arises from the ear-form. Be mindful of the arising of clinging to the ear-form. Be mindful that when clinging to the ear-form is (completely) abandoned, clinging to the ear-form will not arise in the future.

“Remain mindful of the nose-form and the clinging that arises from the nose-form. Be mindful of the arising of clinging to the nose-form. Be mindful that when clinging to the nose-form is (completely) abandoned, clinging to the nose-form will not arise in the future.

“Remain mindful of the tongue-form and the clinging that arises from the tongue-form. Be mindful of the arising of clinging to the tongue-form. Be mindful that when clinging to the tongue-form is (completely) abandoned, clinging to the tongue-form will not arise in the future.

“Remain mindful of the body-form (touch sense) and the clinging that arises from the body-form. Be mindful of the arising of clinging to the body-form. Be mindful that when clinging to the body-form is (completely) abandoned, clinging to the body-form will not arise in the future.

“In this way, one remains mindful of six-sense base and the arising and the passing away of six-sense base – independent of and not clinging to anything in the world. This is how one remains mindful of six-sense base in and of themselves.

Sunday 9:00 AM Session Five

Dhamma Teacher David Allen

MINDFULNESS OF THE SEVEN FACTORS OF AWAKENING

“Furthermore, one remains mindful of the quality of the mind in reference to the Seven Factors of Awakening.

“Remain mindful that ‘mindfulness is a factor of awakening within me.’ If mindfulness as a factor of awakening is not present, be mindful that ‘mindfulness as a factor of awakening is not present within me’ and be mindful of how mindfulness as a factor of awakening will arise. (through appropriate mindfulness)

“Remain mindful of the culmination of the development of mindfulness as a factor of awakening.

“Remain mindful that investigation of the Dhamma is a factor of awakening. If investigation of the Dhamma as a factor of awakening is not present, be mindful that investigation of the Dhamma is not present and be mindful of how investigation of the Dhamma as a factor of awakening will arise. (through appropriate mindfulness)

“Remain mindful of the culmination of the development of investigation of the Dhamma as a factor of awakening.

“Remain mindful that persistence is a factor of awakening. If persistence as a factor of awakening is not present, be mindful that persistence is not present and be mindful of how persistence as a factor of awakening will arise. (through appropriate mindfulness)

“Remain mindful of the culmination of the development of persistence as a factor of awakening.

“Remain mindful that joyful engagement with the Dhamma is a factor of awakening. If joyful engagement with the Dhamma as a factor of awakening is not present, be mindful that joyful engagement with the Dhamma is not present and be mindful of how joyful engagement with the Dhamma as a factor of awakening will arise. (through appropriate mindfulness)

“Remain mindful of the culmination of the development of joyful engagement with the Dhamma as a factor of awakening.

“Remain mindful that serenity is a factor of awakening. If serenity as a factor of awakening is not present, be mindful that serenity is not present and be mindful of how serenity as a factor of awakening will arise. (through appropriate mindfulness)

“Remain mindful of the culmination of the development of serenity as a factor of awakening.

“Remain mindful that concentration is a factor of awakening. If concentration as a factor of awakening is not present, be mindful that concentration is not present and be mindful of how concentration as a factor of awakening will arise. (through appropriate mindfulness)

“Remain mindful of the culmination of the development of concentration as a factor of awakening.

“Remain mindful that equanimity is a factor of awakening. If equanimity as a factor of awakening is not present, be mindful that equanimity is not present and be mindful of how equanimity as a factor of awakening will arise. (through appropriate mindfulness)

“Remain mindful of the culmination of the development of equanimity as a factor of awakening.

“In this way one remains mindful of the Seven Factors of Awakening and the arising and the passing away of the Seven Factors of Awakening – independent of and not clinging to anything in the world. This is how one remains mindful of the Seven Factors of Awakening in and of themselves.

Sunday 12:00 Noon Session Six

Dhamma Teacher Ram Manders

MINDFULNESS OF THE FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS

“Furthermore, one remains mindful of the quality of the mind in reference to The Four Noble Truths.

“Remain mindful of knowing that ‘This is stress, this is the origination of stress, this is the cessation of stress, and this is the Eightfold Path leading to the cessation of stress.’

“In this way one remains mindful of the quality of mind in and of itself internally and externally. One remains mindful of the phenomenon of the origination of qualities of mind and their arising and passing away. There is the knowledge of the maintenance of qualities of mind and their recollection – independent of and not clinging to anything in the world. This is how one remains mindful of the Four Noble Truths in and of themselves.

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE FOUR FOUNDATIONS OF MINDFULNESS

“Now, if anyone develops these Four Foundations of Mindfulness in this manner for seven years one could expect either complete understanding here and now or, if there is any clinging and maintaining remaining, in this present life.

“Let alone seven years, if anyone (perfectly) develops these Four Foundations of Mindfulness in this manner for six, or five, or four, or three, or two, or one year, for six months, or three months, for one month, for two weeks, for seven days, one could expect either complete understanding here and now or, if there is any clinging and maintaining remaining, in this present life.

“Friends, this is the direct path for the purification of all beings, for the cessation of sorrow and regret, for the disappearance of pain and distress, for establishing the right method of practice, and for complete unbinding – in other words, these Four Foundations of Mindfulness.

This is what was said by the Buddha. Hearing these words those assembled were gratified and delighted.

End of Sutta

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