Five Hindrances to Awakening

Hindrances or distractions will arise. They will have no permanent effect on your practice if you persevere. Hindrances are recognized mind states to be aware of. Be with them as dispassionately as possible. As long as you continue with your practice, hindrances will arise and subside until they no longer are a part of your conditioned thinking…

Wisdom and Right Intention – Nagasena Answers King Milinda

As wisdom and understanding develop, Right Intention is seen as the essence of the Dhamma, and of mindfulness. As the Dhamma’s purpose is to develop understanding of dukkha and experience the cessation of the origination of dukkha, clinging, Right Intention is the intention to abandon all forms of clinging. Right Intention also informs the proper application of intelligence and developing wisdom…

The Meghiya Sutta

In the Meghiya Sutta, the Buddha teaches Meghiya five qualities that bring awakening or full human maturity…

The Buddha Taught Happiness

I believe it is wrong speech to misrepresent the Buddha’s Dhamma. Cultural influence, individual views, and a lack of thorough inquiry has led to a “thicket of views” within Buddhism…

Fear, Meditation, Anatta

Fear arising during meditation, particularly shamatha-vipassana meditation, is a subject that comes up often. When meditation is practiced within the framework of the Eightfold Path the context of the Four Noble Truths brings understanding and guidance…

Maha-Assapura Sutta

In the Maha-Assapura Sutta the Buddha teaches the assembled monks and nuns that being known as “contemplatives” and identifying as contemplatives does not fully describe the qualities of one following the Eightfold Path…

Unanswered Questions The Khema Sutta

The Buddha did not make a definitive declaration or left unanswered, questions that could not be answered as the declaration or direct answer would likely develop additional confusion or distraction…

Akankha Sutta Wishes Granted

In the Akankha Sutta the Buddha addresses the  assembled sangha on the wish to be helpful to others.  He teaches that having a mind inclined to compassion and wisdom is noble…

Going Forth

The Buddha called himself the “Tathagata” which means “one who has gone forth and” and has through his own efforts awakened to the truth of reality…

A Dhamma of Mindfulness

Throughout the Buddha’s teaching he emphasized mindfulness. Mindfulness is the quality of mind that brings insight to the Buddha’s teaching…

Dispassion – Freedom From Desire

The Buddha taught that conditioned states of mind have definite and direct causes. This is often referred as the law of conditionality or the law of “if this occurs then that results”…

Modern Buddhism – A Thicket of Views

What I have found through my own direct experience and inquiry is that the attempt to protect a particular modern lineage or to insist on a one-size-fits-all reconciliation of all the modern Buddhist “Dharmas” leads to a confusing and, again in my experience, an ineffective “thicket of views.” The term thicket of views are the words the Buddha used 2600 years ago to describe what would occur by craving for an adapted form of Dharma practice…

Post Election Mindfulness

Post Election Mindfulness is an excerpt from our Saturday morning Dhamma class at Cross River Meditation Center in Frenchtown, New Jersey, on February 4, 2017. A question was asked regarding the turbulence following the recent presidential election about maintaining a calm and well-concentrated mind during these quickly changing times…

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